Image

Deal with it from the inside out

by Kat Mototsune

illustrated by Ben Shannon

This latest volume in the Deal With It series looks at the costs of conforming to social images and the very real dangers of judging a book by its cover.

What are you looking at, punk? Or are you a jock, a goth, or an indie rock guy? The image we project sends signals to others about who we are. But image can also be a prison and the source of many conflicts. This latest volume in the Deal With It series looks at the costs of conforming to social images and the very real dangers of judging a book by its cover.

About the Authors

KAT MOTOTSUNE is a former editor at ChickaDEE Magazine and OWL Books. She is currently a freelance editor and writer, who has worked on dozens of critically acclaimed non-fiction and educational books for children, including many volumes in the Deal With It series. She lives in Toronto.
BEN SHANNON is an illustrator, musician, and founding member of the Royal Academy of Illustration and Design, an illustrator's studio in Toronto. His work has appeared in publications such as Rolling Stone, Wired, National Geographic World, and the Globe and Mail.

Reviews

Everyone wants to be liked and have friends, but tweens and teens who are just starting to take control over their lives are more likely to have problems with their self-image. This book, with its very cool illustrations, will immediately grab teenagers' attention, not only because of its appealing graphic novel-like look, but also because it deals with one of the major issues that tweens and teens are concerned with.

The book examines what things contribute to people's perception of you, about realizing that there are some things that you can control (what you spend your money on, who you spend your time with, etc.) and other things that you can't (your age, body type, ethnic background, etc...). It also gives kids information about things they may not realize, e.g. companies are constantly starting new trends to keep teens spending their money; only 5% of women ever achieve the ideal women's body as seen in advertisements, the tough "gangsta" look is inspired by real crime (hoodies make it hard to identify people and loose pants are useful for concealing a weapon),etc... This book encourages kids to think for themselves and start acting in ways that are true to themselves, not just what they think is "cool". All of this useful information is delivered in a highly-appealing package to kids no matter what group or clique they may identify with. Highly recommended.


Heather Empey - "Resource Links - Volume 13 - Number 3 - February 2008

Heather Empey, Resource Links - Volumer 13, Number 3

Image encourages kids to think for themselves and start acting in ways that are true to themselves, not just what they think is "cool". All of this useful information is delivered in a highly-appealing package to kids no matter what group or clique they may identify with."

Highly recommended.

Heather Empey, Resource Links

Awards

Year's Best - Resource Links
2008

Subjects (BISAC)

Subjects

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